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USDA Food and Nutrition Service opens Farm to School grant

USDA Food and Nutrition Service opens Farm to School grant

Funding Opportunity #: 
USDA-FNS-F2S-FY2018
Open (Posted) Date: 
10/04/2017
Closed Date: 
12/08/2017

In this funding cycle USDA anticipates awarding approximately $5 million in grant funding to support efforts that improve access to local foods in schools. Grant funds will be made available on a competitive basis, subject to availability of federal funds. Applicants may apply for a Planning grant, Implementation grant, or Training grant. Planning grant awards will range from $20,000-$50,000 and implementation grant awards will from $50,000-$100,000. Funding for training grants is expected to range from $20,000-$50,000. For all three types of grants, the federal share of a project cannot exceed 75 percent of the total cost of the project, as required by the Healthy Hunger-Free Kids Act of 2010. Therefore, the applicant must provide at least 25 percent of the costs of the total project. The total project cost is the federal grant request amount plus the applicant match.

The RFA and other helpful documents are located under “Related Documents” on grants.gov!

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Science Post Graduate Scholarship apps due Oct. 31

Science Post Graduate Scholarship apps due Oct. 31

Science Post Graduate Scholarship Fund (S.T.E.M. Loan for Service)

 

Note: All applicants are required to submit a Tribal Eligibility Certificate (TEC) and Financial Needs Form (FNF) which is always available at www.aigcs.org where you may also review the AIGC Online Application Instructions.

Science Post Graduate Scholarship Fund (STEM Loan for Service) is a graduate level educational loan awarded to enrolled members of a federally recognized American Indian tribe or Alaska Native group OR provide documentation of ancestry to possession of one-fourth degree Indian blood of a federally recognized tribe pursuing graduate or professional level education. To be considered, applicants must possess a minimum 3.0 GPA and be pursuing a master, doctorate or professional degree in the STEM fields. Must be (or will be) pursuing a master’s or doctorate degree as a full-time degree-seeking student at an accredited graduate school in the United States. Exclusive consideration is paid to degree candidates in the Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) fields (may include: Medical and Life Sciences; Engineering and Physical Sciences; Mathematics and Computational Sciences, Earth, Environmental and Agriculture Sciences; and Technology) to be verified through the submission of current transcripts or proof of acceptance to an eligible program;

The specific purpose of the Science Post Graduate Scholarship Fund (SPGSF) program is to provide financial assistance to eligible American Indian and Alaska Native graduate and professional degree candidates to promote Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) research in and opportunities for careers with Bureau of Indian Education (BIE) and BIE funded organizations on and off reservation and tribal governments. Future employment with other federal and state agencies and private entities may be eligible if the organization’s primary mission is assistance and support to tribal communities or individuals.

Advanced education is the STEM fields is in greater demand than ever before, particularly in Indian communities. Many tribal lands are situated on lands with greater natural resources potential that requirement individuals with education, skills and expertise to sustainably develop resources. Indian students in STEM fields often recognize the importance of reinvesting their knowledge back into their home communities, bringing skills back to home tribes or other tribal communities. There is a high deficiency in STEMfields and urgency for research to understand why. A portion of the SPGSF will be directed towards graduate level (Masters and Doctoral) research to understand the barriers that discourage Indian students participation in these fields and expanding STEM opportunities at Tribal Colleges and Universities.

The SPGSF is a loan for service program to be served on a 1 per 1 basis, i.e., one year of funding per one year of service. The maximum amount of an award will be up to $30,000 per year. Actual award amounts and the number of awards will be determined based on the number of funded students at each academic level (master’s, professional and doctoral).

Note: All applicants are required to submit a Tribal Eligibility Certificate (TEC) and Financial Needs Form (FNF) which is always available at www.aigcs.org where you may also review the AIGC Online Application Instructions.

Award Up to $30,000
Deadline10/31/2017

Supplemental Questions

  1. All applicants for the STEM Loan for Service must be in good academic standing. Please upload your most recent transcript verifying your academic eligibility for this program.
  2. The AIGC STEM Loan for Service opportunity is primarily intended for individuals with a willingness and ability to accept employment with the Bureau of Indian Affairs, Bureau of Indian Education, other federal agencies/positions primarily serving American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) communities, state or local government agencies/positions primarily serving AI/AN communities or tribal governments. Secondarily, AIGC STEM Loan for Service recipients MAY be approved for employment in non-government organizations (NGO), Community Based Organizations (CBO) or other organizations where the STEM Loan for Service Fellow will work primarily with or within American Indian Communities. The BIE Office of Higher Education holds the sole responsibility for approval of all aforementioned positions which must begin within six (6) months of graduation; therefore, it is imperative that recipients understand that they should seek a variety of positions prior to completing their graduate program. Most BIE position openings can be reviewed at www.usajobs.com. Selecting the “I agree” box below indicates to AIGC and the BIE that applicants and eventual recipients of the AIGC STEM Loan for Service agree to seek and accept employment in the primary foci areas of this award. Please note that in some cases it may require that a recipient RELOCATE to obtain suitable employment for this service related payback.
  3. In 500 words or less, please describe how your selected STEM major will apply to the intent of the STEM Loan for Service program (see previous question) as it applies to our personal committment to serve the American Indian and Alaska Native community.
  4. Please list your four (4) most recent paid and unpaid employment positions
    • Dates of employment
    • Describe the duties of the position
    • Name of organization
    • Title of your position
  5. Please list up to four (4) community engagement opportunities in which you have recently engaged
    • Dates of this community engagement
    • Describe the activities in which you participated for this community engagement opportunity
    • Name of Organization
  6. Please list up to four (4) leadership roles you have held in recent years
    • Dates of leadership role
    • Describe the activities associated with this leadership role
    • Leadership role/position/title
    • Name of organization
  7. LFS: Please provide contact information for someone who can address questions regarding your academic strengths and abilities. Make sure you enter a correct email address for the person you named to be your reference.
  8. LFS: Please provide contact information for someone who can address your community service and leadership history and potential. Make sure you enter a correct email address for the person you named to be your reference.
  9. Program Plan: If you have a Program Plan (a map of coursework by terms toward degree/diploma completion), please upload it here. This will help program staff to determine your persistence and academic success for future funding.
  10. Please tell us how you heard about the American Indian Graduate Center and our opportunities. This information will help to inform us in future outreach activities.
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Intertribal Agriculture Council seeks youth essay applicants

Intertribal Agriculture Council seeks youth essay applicants

The Intertribal Agriculture Council is accepting essay applications for its 2017 Youth Essay Contest. Essays will be judged on organization of information, spelling and punctuation, quality of grammar and quality of entry. Three finalists will be chosen and honored during the IAC Annual Meeting and Youth Alliance Conference.

Essay Topic:

The next generation of Indian Agriculture will be at the forefront of meeting America’s demand for food security. Our young leaders have been filling crucial roles at home, producing the food that feeds our communities. Now, Indian Country relies on our youth to carry our message farther than ever before. Ensuring a Native voice is heard in the 2018 Farm Bill is a critical concern for the Intertribal Agriculture Council, and we need your help in doing so.

What does my community need in the Farm Bill?

How does the Farm Bill impact Indian Agriculture?

What programs in my community are impacted by the Farm Bill?

How will I take an active role in ensuring my community is represented by the 2018 Farm Bill?

What are two steps my chaperone* and I must take to ensure we effectively reach this active role in our community?

*Designated chaperones awarded a travel scholarship are required to attend all IAC Membership Meeting sessions, December 11-14, 2017.

 

RESOURCES: An Assessment of Risks and Opportunities for Native Communities in the Farm Bill can be found on the website: www.IndianAgLink.com/FarmBill

REGISTRATION FEE: Includes all sessions, workshops & the luncheon to be held Tuesday afternoon. For additional information on the registration fees see the registration form.

PROCEDURE: Complete the registration form and return with payment to: Intertribal Agriculture Council 100 North 27th Street, Suite #500 Billings, MT 59101 No purchase orders PLEASE! (Methods of payments accepted: cash, check or credit card; Am. Express, Master Card or Visa)

HOTEL: Address: 4455 PARADISE ROAD | LAS VEGAS, NV | 89169 RESERVATIONS: 1.800.473.7625 (Cancellation Policy is 72 hours) To receive special rate of $85.00 + tax, Please refer to code: SIACM7 when Calling for reservations. Reservation deadline to receive this special rate is: NOVEMBER 17, 2017 -based on availability.

TRANSPORTATION: Las Vegas McCarran International Airport is served directly by shuttle, bus, and taxi (http:// www.las-vegas-las.com/index.html). Public transportation is also available for travel both to and from the airport.

RODEO TICKETS: http://www.nfr-rodeo.com/nfrprices.html 1-888-NFR-Rodeo www.nationalfinalsrodeotickets.com

CANCELLATION: Request for cancellation must be in writing to IAC and received before November 17, 2017. All cancellations are subject to a $75.00 processing fee. No refunds will be made for cancellations after November 17, 2017. Room reservations must be canceled directly through the Hard Rock Hotel.

The Hard Rock Hotel Room Reservation Code is: SIACM7 Phone: 1-800-473-7625 ONLINE RESERVATIONS CAN BE MADE AT : aws.passkey.com/go/iacmembershipmtg

2017 IAC is exempt from the hotel early check in fee, but does not guarantee rooms will be available prior to 4pm.

 

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Seneca Nation awarded RWJF Culture of Health Prize Winner

Seneca Nation awarded RWJF Culture of Health Prize Winner

The Seneca Nation of Indians was recently awarded a 2017 Robert Wood Johnson foundation Culture of Health Prize Winner.

Please visit the RWJF.org website to read their story, watch the video and see the photo slideshow of their impressive efforts to use culture to heal, language and food traditions to foster wellness, and compassion and culture as restorative medicine.

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Consultation on USDA reorganization set for NCAI

Consultation on U.S. Department of Agriculture Reorganization
National Congress of American Indians
Annual Convention and Marketplace
October 19, 2017 (6 pm CT)

Wisconsin Center, Room 103D/E
400 W Wisconsin Ave.
Milwaukee, WI 53203

In May 2017, Agriculture Secretary Perdue announced a reorganization of key agencies in the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) to make “USDA the most effective, efficient, and best managed department in the U.S. government.” Since the National Congress of American Indians passed a resolution requesting consultation on this reorganization, USDA continues seeking ways to enhance customer service and maximize efficiency by aligning offices and agencies with similar missions. USDA will be holding a consultation regarding both phases of this reorganization and its implications on Indian Country.

If you have any questions or would like additional information, please contact the USDA Office of Tribal Relations by phone at (202) 205-2249, or by e-mail at Tribal.Relations@osec.usda.gov.

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Friends of IFAI present at First Americans and New Americans panel

Friends of IFAI present at First Americans and New Americans panel

 

Panelists, from right, Arcenio Lopez, Chairman John Berrey, Jodi Gillette and Dolores Huerta, discuss economic and environmental justice at the First Americans and New Americans convening held at the Kennedy Center.

IFAI supporters John Berrey, chairman of the Quapaw Tribe of Oklahoma, and Jodi Gillette, policy advisor for Sonosky, Chambers, Sachse, Endreson & Perry LLP, spoke at the First Americans and New Americans gathering on Sept. 14 held at the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts in Washington, DC. Their panel, Advancing Our Shared Issues and Common Cause: Interdependency for Collaborative Frameworks, explored the interrelated issues of economic justice, environmental justice, and food systems and food sovereignty. The session examined interdependencies and how they can drive more powerful collaborative frameworks for action and policy.

The historic event was called to create a forward-looking convening of nationally recognized Native nation and Immigrant leaders at a pivotal time for the communities they represent. Each group contends with dominant false narratives and the destructive laws and policies borne of those narratives. The gathering encouraged these communities to learn from one another, explore opportunities for joint action, and discuss how to reshape the “American” identity to include the histories and present contributions of First Americans and New Americans.

Attendees were asked to recognize the urgency of our current political climate and the need to develop visionary, self-determined solutions. Attendees addressed shared challenges to advance a common purpose in vital areas such as civil rights, economic and environmental justice, and food systems and food sovereignty – all through a lens of culture, identity, and citizenship.

 

FIRST AMERICANS and NEW AMERICANS: 

Forging Shared Narratives around Culture, Identity, and Citizenship

 

The National Congress of American Indians and Define American welcome Native nation and Immigrant leaders to participate in an historic conversation.

 

Thursday, September 14th, 2017

Cultural Performance & Leadership Reception:  6:00 – 9:00 PM EDT

Friday, September 15th, 2017

Convening:  9:00 AM – 4:00 PM EDT

John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts,
2700 F Street NW, Washington, DC 20566

 

 

Thursday, September 14

6:00             p.m.    Joint Cultural Performances at the Kennedy Center’s Millennium Stage

  • Dark Water Rising
  • Combo Chimbita

7:00 p.m.    Leadership Reception

  • Meet & Greet
  • Art Showcase

8:00 p.m.    Arts and Culture: A National Conversation around Shared Strengths

  • Kevin Gover (Pawnee), Director, National Museum of the American Indian
  • Erika Andiola, Co-Founder of DREAM Action Coalition, Political Director of Our Revolution

 

Friday, September 15

MORNING SESSION: Building Collective Understandings of Our Shared Challenges

8:30 a.m.       Registration and Networking

9:00 a.m.       Welcome and Opening Prayer

  • Brian Cladoosby (Swinomish), President, National Congress of American Indians

9:10 a.m.       Spoken Word Poet

  • Nicholas Courtney (Makah and Modoc)

9:15 a.m.       Converging Narratives: Righting Our Past and Present through Story

Nationally recognized voices will share their unique and converging experiences regarding their work to reshape the “American” identity to raise up the vibrant histories and present contributions of First Americans and New Americans.

  • José Antonio Vargas, CEO, Define American (moderator)
  • Clarissa Martinez De Castro, Deputy Vice President, UnidosUS
  • Jacqueline Pata (Raven/Sockeye Clan of Tlingit Tribe), Executive Director, National Congress of American Indians

10:00 a.m.     Break – Networking

10:10 a.m.     Advancing Our Shared Issues and Common Cause: Interdependency for Collaborative Frameworks

Exploring the interrelated issues of economic justice, environmental justice, and food systems and food sovereignty, this session will examine our interdependencies and how they can drive more powerful collaborative frameworks for action and policy.

  • Maria Hinojosa, Anchor/Executive Producer, Latino USA, NPR (moderator)
  • John Berrey, Chairman, Business Committee, Quapaw Tribe of Oklahoma
  • Jodi Gillette (Hunkpapa and Oglala Lakota), Policy Advisor, Sonosky, Chambers, Sachse, Endreson & Perry, LLP
  • Dolores Huerta, Civil Rights Activist, Co-Founder of the United Farm Workers of America
  • Arcenio Lopez, Executive Director, Mixteco/Indigena Community Organizing Project

11:15 a.m.    Q&A Session

11:35 a.m.    Framing the Afternoon’s Breakout Discussions and Collaborative Framework

This overview will set the framework for the afternoon’s breakout group discussions, which will delve into the some of the most pressing and cross-cutting issues facing Tribal and Immigrant communities today through the lens of identity, culture, and citizenship.

  • Ryan Eller, Executive Director, Define American: Introduce topics and topic leaders
  • Citizenship and Human Rights: José Antonio Vargas, CEO, Define American
  • Economic Justice: Gerald Sherman (Oglala Lakota), Founding Director, Lakota Funds
  • Identity and Race: Jonathan Jayes Green, Co-Founder and Network Coordinator, UndocuBlack Network
  • Food Systems and Food Sovereignty: Janie Simms Hipp (Chickasaw Nation) Indigenous Food and Agriculture Initiative, University of Arkansas
  • Environmental Justice: TBA

 

LUNCH SESSION: Growing Relationships Through Food

12:00 p.m.     Food Systems Presentation and Breakout Group Member Introductions

Native and Immigrant Executive Chefs will present the meal and talk about the importance of food systems and food sovereignty as it relates to identity, culture, and citizenship.

  • Freddie Bitsoie (Diné [Navajo]), Executive Chef, Mitsitam Native Foods Café, National Museum of the American Indian
  • Cristina Martinez, Chef/Owner, Barbacoa

 

AFTERNOON SESSION: Developing a Framework for Joint Action

1:00 p.m.       Facilitated Breakout Discussions

2:00 p.m.       Break – Networking

2:10 p.m.       Spoken Word Poet

  • Yosimar Reyes

2:15 p.m.       Sharing with the Whole: Breakout Groups Report Out

2:50 p.m.       Deepening Our Sense of “We”: Intersectionality and Alliances Across Our Shared

Communities

Focusing on the southern U.S. border and how land connects peoples and cultures, Native and Immigrant leaders will explore alliances and points of intersectionality as it plays out within a single region.

  • Ian Record, Director, Partnership for Tribal Governance, National Congress of American Indians (moderator)
  • Erika Andiola, Co-Founder of DRM Action Coalition, Political Director of Our Revolution
  • Edward D. Manuel, Chairman, Tohono O’odham Nation

3:20 p.m.       Forging Our Next Steps for Collective Action

This session will engage in the important work of formulating a Collaborative Framework, learning how to “Show up for one another”, and identifying next steps to refining and driving our shared narratives and priorities.

  • Building Our Collaborative Framework
  • Our Top Takeaway Priorities
  • Meeting Again to Deepen Our Shared Work

3:50 p.m.       Spoken Word Poets

  • Yosimar Reyes
  • Nicholas Courtney (Makah and Modoc)

3:55 p.m.       Closing

4:00 p.m.       Adjourn

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