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IFAI announces final schedule for PROFIT workshops and webinars

PROFIT_Emailheader

 

The PROFIT series provides important information about the latest on food safety regulations and GAP certification, crop insurance and risk management tools, and participants receive hands on experience in “one-page financial,” “one-page risk assessment” and “one-page business plan” tools. The series also provides information on how operations can participate in food hubs, farm-to-school, ag cooperatives and other new market ventures linking small, beginning, mid-size and remote producers into new market opportunities.

With support from the USDA Risk Management Agency, the University of Arkansas School of Law Indigenous Food and Agriculture Initiative has joined with the Farm Credit Council, the Intertribal Agriculture Council and Morse Marketing to offer an important set of workshops in Oklahoma and the Arizona/New Mexico region, and a set of workshops for Pacific Northwest Tribes during 2016.

Each in-person workshop will cover the following information:

  • “One-Page” Financials
  • “One-Page” Business Planning
  • “One-Page” Risk Assessment
  • Food Safety Regulations Update and GAP Overview
  • Risk Management and Crop Insurance Policy Updates
  • Marketing Models and Business Entities
  • Legal Issues (General)
  • Business Planning

 

Click here to download a printable schedule.

Remaining In-person Workshop Locations and Dates:

Workshops include light refreshments. Immediately following the workshop, a Model Food Code Project Roundtable will take place.

Tuesday, Sept. 21
Southwest Intertribal Agriculture Conference
Navajo Twin Arrows Resort
22181 Resort Blvd
Flagstaff, AZ 86004

Monday, Sept. 26
4 – 8 pm
Coeur d’Alene Casino Resort Hotel
37914 South Nukwalqw
Worley, Idaho 83876

 

In addition to the in-person workshops, we will also offer webinar workshops. Each webinar requires registration to participate. Please use the link below to register for the webinar of your interest:

Online Webinars:

Wednesday, May 25, 2 – 4 pm Central:           
“What Producers Think about their own Risk Exposure and Risk Management Needs”
Click here to download the slides from this presentation. Click here to view this presentation on YouTube.

Thursday, May 26, 2 – 4 pm Central:
“Food Safety:  An In-Depth Update on FSMA and How Crop Insurance Figures into Food Safety (the Southern Plains and Southwest)”
Click here to download the slides from this presentation. Click here to view this presentation on YouTube.

Friday, May 27, 2 – 4 pm Central:
“Food Safety:  An In-Depth Update on FSMA and How Crop Insurance Figures into Food Safety (the Pacific Northwest & Upper Great Plains)”
Click here to download slide presentations from Part 1 and Part 2. Click here to view this presentation on YouTube.

Tuesday, June 21, 2 – 4 pm Central:
“General Food Safety Liability and Introduction to Legal Issues in Marketing”
Click here to download the slides from this presentation. Click here to view this presentation on YouTube.

Tuesday, July 26, 2 – 4 pm Central:
“Participating in New Market Ventures – – How Best to Evaluate your Risk”
Click here to download the slides from this presentation. Click here to view this presentation on YouTube.

Tuesday, August 30, 11 am – 1 pm Central:
“Business Planning and Tax Concerns for Farmers and Ranchers, New and Experienced”
Click here to download the slides from this presentation. Click here to view this presentation on YouTube.

Tuesday, August 30, 2 – 4 pm Central:
“Crop Insurance Capstone:  Critical Issues in Crop Insurance”
Click here to download the slides from this presentation. Click here to view this presentation on YouTube.

Thursday, Sept. 1, 2 – 4 pm Central:
“Farm to School and Beyond: Analyzing Opportunities to Sell Food to Institutional Settings in Indian Country”
Click here to download slide presentations from Part 1 and Part 2. Click here to view this presentation on YouTube.

Thursday, Sept. 8, 2 – 4 pm Central
“Making Money While Reaching Your Goals”
Click here to download the slides from this presentation. Click here to view this presentation on YouTube.

 

This workshop and webinar series is sponsored through the support of the USDA Risk Management Agency and of the participating sponsors. Please attend and tell others who might be interested!

If you have any questions, please contact Janie Hipp (jhipp@uark.edu) or Michelle Ryel (mlryel@uark.edu) at (479) 575-4434.

 

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Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Funds Tribal Food Policy Study

Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Funds Tribal Food Policy Study

The study, conducted by the Indigenous Food and Agriculture Initiative, will examine the link between tribal food policy and community health

FAYETTEVILLE, Ark. — The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation has awarded a $189,983 grant to the Indigenous Food and Agriculture Initiative, based in the University of Arkansas School of Law, to study the link between tribal food policy and community health.

The study will analyze the effects of tribal food policy on community health, diet and food access in tribal communities. Data compiled in the study will be available for tribal governments to use in guiding future food policy decisions.

“Tribal nations are moving toward reclaiming healthy food access and food production, and an important part of exercising this sovereign power is through policy development,” said Janie Simms Hipp, the initiative’s director.

Researchers will study how tribal communities use food sovereignty assessments and analyze current and historic food systems to determine the effectiveness of federal feeding programs and local tribal laws and policies in reducing food insecurity, and improving food systems and health in tribal communities.

Crystal Echo Hawk (Pawnee) of Echo Hawk Consulting, Wilson Pipestem (Otoe-Missouria) of Pipestem Law, and Valerie Segrest (Muckleshoot) of the Muckleshoot Food Sovereignty Project are key partners in this effort.

Echo Hawk has nearly 18 years of social justice experience in Indian Country and was instrumental in publishing “Feeding Ourselves,” an examination of the challenges Native Americans face in accessing healthy food. Pipestem, an attorney and sovereignty advocate, has dedicated his career to assisting tribal governments to increase sovereign authority on tribal lands and expand tribal land bases. Segrest, a nutritionist and project coordinator for the Muckleshoot project, works to educate others about the importance of a traditional, nutrient-rich diet. She co-authored the 2010 book Feeding the People, Feeding the Spirit.

The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation has committed to helping all Americans have an equal opportunity to pursue a healthier life. Funding is directed toward issues that include child and family well-being, the improvement of health coverage and health care systems, and the promotion of healthy communities and healthy weight among children.

Obesity and diabetes in Indian Country

The study of the linkage between tribal food policy and the health in tribal communities comes at a time when the health disparities related to food insecurity in Indian Country are at crisis levels.

According to the 2015 report “Feeding Ourselves,” Native Americans continue to suffer from serious health problems and their average life expectancy is nearly five years less than other Americans. In addition:

  • More than 80 percent of Native American and Alaska Native adults ages 20 to 74 are overweight.
  • Childhood obesity often exceeds 50 percent in tribal communities.
  • Nearly 30 percent of Native American and Alaska Native adults are pre-diabetic.
  • Nearly 50 percent of Native American and Alaska Native children will develop Type 2 diabetes.
  • Higher incidences of obesity and diabetes lead to greater rates of related illnesses such as cancer, heart disease, amputations, strokes and other health traumas.

About the Indigenous Food and Agriculture Initiative: The initiative enhances health and wellness in tribal communities by advancing healthy food systems, diversified economic development and cultural food traditions in Indian Country. The initiative empowers tribal governments, farmers, ranchers and food businesses by providing strategic planning and technical assistance; by creating new academic and professional education programs in food systems and agriculture; and by increasing student enrollment in land grant universities in food and agricultural related disciplines.

LL.M. Program in Agricultural and Food Law: The first advanced law degree in agricultural and food law was founded at the University of Arkansas School of Law more than 30 years ago. The LL.M. Program in Food and Agricultural Law was also the first to offer a fully integrated opportunity for face-to-face and distance education options. With the LL.M. Program as the foundation, the University of Arkansas School of Law publishes the nation’s first student-edited specialized journal devoted to food law and policy issues and sustains outreach efforts such as the Indigenous Food and Agriculture Initiative and the Food Recovery Project, which connect academic scholarship with critical legal and policy issues.

About University of Arkansas School of Law: The University of Arkansas School of Law prepares students for success through a challenging curriculum taught by nationally recognized faculty, unique service opportunities and a close-knit community that puts students first. With alumni in all 50 states, the District of Columbia, two territories and 20 countries, it has been ranked among the top 10 “Values in Legal Education” by the National Jurist magazine for three consecutive years and is among the top 46 public law schools, according to U.S. News and World Report.

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CONTACTS:

Janie Simms Hipp, director (Chickasaw)
Indigenous Food and Agriculture Initiative,
479-575-4699, jhipp@uark.edu

Erin Shirl, assistant director
Indigenous Food and Agriculture Initiative,
479-575-6572, eshirl@uark.edu

Bryan Pollard, director of external tribal relations (Cherokee)
Indigenous Food and Agriculture Initiative
479-575-3765, bpollard@uark.edu

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Native Youth Summit leaders chosen for national Farm Credit honor

Native Youth Summit leaders chosen for national Farm Credit honor

Fayetteville, Ark. – Two Indigenous Food and Agriculture Initiative Native Youth Summit leaders have been chosen as Farm Credit 100 Fresh Perspective honorees in recognition of their work to change rural communities and agriculture for the better.

Oldham

Odessa Oldham

Odessa Oldham (Navajo), of Lander, Wyo., and Zachary Ilbery (Cherokee), of Checotah, Okla., were selected for the honor by a panel of agricultural leaders and are veterans of the Native Youth in Agriculture Summer Leadership Summit held at the University of Arkansas School of Law in Fayetteville. The honorees were announced at a National Ag Day event on March 15, 2016, at the National Press Club in Washington, D.C.

Oldham, Camp Director of the summit, began her own agriculture operation with a USDA Farm Service Agency youth loan, which has since grown into a 600 cattle, 100 sheep and 60 horse partnership with her brothers and sister. She was the first Native American candidate for a national FFA office and has assisted in chartering FFA chapters throughout Indian Country.
She witnessed firsthand the need for a leadership training opportunity available to Native youth interested in agriculture and food production. This inspired her involvement in the summit – a nine-day, comprehensive educational experience incorporating classroom and experiential learning centered around food system development and sustainability.

“Indian Country is moving forward, youth are our future, and they need to see the importance of agriculture and embrace their heritage,” said Oldham.

Ilbery, a high school FFA Chapter President and Summit Fellow, is an agricultural entrepreneur who began running his own cattle operation two years ago at age 15. He now manages a 150-head herd. At the summit, he learned how important financial management would be in the success of his fledgling business venture. With his grandfather as co-signer, he was able to secure a loan to finance his dream.

“The future of agriculture will be challenging, but if we educate people on the importance of agriculture and what it does for us, then we can better ourselves for the future,” said Ilbery.

Ilbery

Zach Ilbery

Selected by a panel of experts on rural matters, including Farm Credit leaders and others from around the agriculture industry, honorees like Oldham and Ilbery are among the best-of-the-best who are positively shaping what is next for rural communities and agriculture.

“We are so proud of the work of Odessa and Zach,” said U of A School of Law Dean Stacy Leeds (Cherokee). “They are exactly the type of leaders we had in mind as we designed the program and we look forward to watching their careers unfold. They will serve Indian Country well.”
Farm Credit launched the Farm Credit 100 Fresh Perspectives program as part of its 100th anniversary of service to rural communities and agriculture.  As a Farm Credit 100 Fresh Perspectives honoree Oldham joins an impressive list of leaders in agriculture and rural enterprise.

“Farm Credit has supported rural communities and agriculture for 100 years, and we understand the vision and commitment it takes to remain successful as rural America evolves and changes,” said Todd Van Hoose, president and chief executive officer of the Farm Credit Council. “The Farm Credit 100 Fresh Perspectives honorees are inspiring examples of leaders who are creating a brighter, more vibrant future for rural America.”

For a complete list of the Farm Credit 100 Fresh Perspectives honorees, visit farmcredit100.com/top100.

 

About the Indigenous Food and Agriculture Initiative: The Initiative enhances health and wellness in tribal communities by advancing healthy food systems, diversified economic development and cultural food traditions in Indian Country. We empower tribal governments, farmers, ranchers and food businesses by providing strategic planning and technical assistance; by creating new academic and professional education programs in food systems and agriculture; and by increasing student enrollment in land grant universities in food and agricultural related disciplines.

About Farm Credit
Farm Credit supports rural communities and agriculture with reliable, consistent credit and financial services, today and tomorrow. Farm Credit has been fulfilling its mission of helping rural America grow and thrive for a century by providing farmers with the capital they need to make their businesses successful and by financing vital infrastructure and communication services. For more information about Farm Credit please visit www.farmcredit.com.

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