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IFAI director to present at the Chickasaw Nation Dynamic Women’s Conference

SULPHUR, Oklahoma – A day of sharing the vision of artists, musicians, scholars, and others is planned for the 2016 Chickasaw Nation Dynamic Women’s Conference. The conference will take place Thursday, April 14-15, at the Artesian Hotel and Spa.

A slate of presenters are scheduled for the two-day event including Janie Simms Hipp, J.D., LL.M., a Chickasaw citizen who is the Founding Director of the Indigenous Food and Agriculture Initiative at the University Of Arkansas School Of Law.  Ms. Hipp served in the Obama administration, the Bush administration and within the USDA Risk Management Agency as national risk management education director.

Registration deadline is March 25.

This annual event, which is open to the public, salutes the valuable contributions, skills and talents of dynamic Chickasaw women, through panel discussions, sessions and lessons on topics related to the Chickasaw experience and the panelist’s personal endeavors.

Mary Ruth Barnes, Ada, was named the 2015 Dynamic Woman of the Year by Chickasaw Nation Governor Bill Anoatubby. She will serve as keynote speaker for the conference.

A visual artist, Mrs. Barnes has received several awards for her art, as well as her work with the American Cancer Society.

She has a bachelor’s in English from North Carolina State and a master’s degree in education from Montana State. Mrs. Barnes is extremely active in her community and she is member of several service organizations.

Conference registration begins at 8:30 a.m., Thursday, April 14, in the Artesian Hotel lobby.

Opening remarks are set for 9 a.m. The first session features C.J. Aducci, Ph.D., Chickasaw Nation Department of Strong Family Development executive officer, who will present “But I Could Draw: Chickasaw Women in the Face of Adversity.”

The presentation stems from Dr. Aducci’s research about Chickasaw historical trauma and resilience.

Lunch is served at 11:30 a.m., followed Mrs. Barnes’ keynote address.

Afternoon breakout sessions and “Art of the Chickasaw Woman” exhibit reception at 3:45 p.m. at the ARTesian Gallery and Studios conclude the day.

Friday, April 15 events include a “Next Generation Panel” at 9:15 a.m.

Dr. Tina Cooper will present “Beautiful Mind,” at 1:15 p.m., April 15.

A Chickasaw physician, Dr. Cooper’s message will focus on ways to stay mentally healthy, with a lesson on the workings of the mind, diagnosis of the mind, including depression and anxiety, migraine headaches and ways to promote mental health.

The event will close with a Dynamic Women Panel including Chickasaw elder Jeraldine Brown, actress Christie Volkmer, educator Merry Monroe and journalist Lisanne Anderson.

Established in 2006, the Dynamic Woman of the Year Award honors Chickasaw women who have made significant contributions to the Chickasaw Nation, serve as role-models to other Chickasaw women and have made a difference in the lives of Chickasaws and other citizens, enriching their communities and society at large.

Registration forms are available here.

For more information, please contact Chickasaw Nation Arts & Humanities at (580) 272-5520 or by email to paul.baken@chickasaw.net  or nickolas.brown@chickasaw.net.

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IFAI director appointed to conservation council

IFAI director appointed to conservation council

Janie Simms Hipp, J.D., LL.M. (Chickasaw), director of the Indigenous Food and Agriculture Initiative at the University of Arkansas School of Law, was recently appointed to the USDA Regional Tribal Conservation Advisory Council (RTCAC) for the Eastern Region. The council is an advisory body for the USDA’s Natural Resources Conservation Service.

jhippHipp will serve a three-year term as a Regional Tribal Organization representative, along with 15 others who were appointed as Federal or Tribal representatives.

Executive Order 13175, signed in 2000 and titled “Consultation and Coordination with Indian Tribal Governments,” requires that NRCS establish regular and meaningful consultation with Tribal Officials when developing Federal policy that have Tribal implications.  Title 410, General Manual, Part 405, establishes policy for NRCS employees regarding interaction with Indian Tribes.  In June of 2011, the NRCS Chief signed a decision memorandum to establish the creation of RTCAC.  These councils will provide a direct line of communication from Tribes to NRCS leaders and policy makers at regional and national levels and provide a venue for agency leadership to gather input on Tribal issues.

The advisory council will assist the conservation service in identifying ways to improve relationships with Tribes as it relates to these and other issues:

  • Providing quality service through programs and service, including technical and financial assistance.
  • Promoting strong partnerships and teamwork.
  • Providing Tribes the opportunity to offer feedback on agency programs and services.
  • Assisting Tribes in enhancing their capacity in natural resources conservation.
  • Delivering the most effective resource conservation technology.

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About the Indigenous Food and Agriculture Initiative: The Initiative enhances health and wellness in tribal communities by advancing healthy food systems, diversified economic development and cultural food traditions in Indian Country. We empower tribal governments, farmers, ranchers and food businesses by providing strategic planning and technical assistance; by creating new academic and professional education programs in food systems and agriculture; and by increasing student enrollment in land grant universities in food and agricultural related disciplines.

 

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New Grants Fund Indigenous Food and Agriculture Initiative’s PROFIT Series

FAYETTEVILLE, Ark. — The Indigenous Food and Agriculture Initiative in the University of Arkansas School of Law has received two $99,992 grants from the United States Department of Agriculture’s Risk Management Agency. The grants will fund a series of risk-management presentations prepared by the initiative.

The series, “PROFIT: Crop Insurance, Financial Management Updates and Food Safety Risk Prevention,” will address legal issues relevant to tribal government officials and Native American farmers and ranchers in the USDA’s Spokane and Oklahoma City regions.

Comprehensive risk management is essential to any farmer’s or rancher’s success, but Indian Country producers face unique legal, regulatory and financial challenges that complicate the risk management landscape. Through this partnership with the agency, the initiative will offer the specific training that Native American producers need to handle emerging legal developments, including new complex food safety requirements and innovative crop insurance programming.

The PROFIT presentations will educate farmers and ranchers about the kinds of risk addressed by the USDA’s risk-management tools, to teach appropriate use of these tools, and to establish methods for making sound risk management decisions.

“The Indigenous Food and Agriculture Initiative does an excellent job of supporting itself through grants,” said Jim Rankin, vice provost for research and economic development at the U of A. “It consistently looks for and secures funds to support its innovative programs.”

Part of the initiative’s mission is to empower tribal governments, farmers, ranchers and food businesses by providing strategic planning and technical assistance, as well as creating professional education programs in food systems and agriculture.

The PROFIT presentations will be offered at seven locations within the two regions, and via four scheduled webinars. The times, dates and locations will be published to the initiative’s website and social media accounts once they are available.

Comprehensive risk management is essential to operator success, but Indian Country producers face unique legal, regulatory and financial challenges that complicate the risk management landscape. Through this partnership with the agency, the initiative will offer the specific training that Native American producers need to handle emerging legal developments, including new complex food safety requirements and innovative crop insurance programming.

The USDA’s Risk Management Agency has oversight of the Federal Crop Insurance Corporation. Through the corporation, the agency provides crop insurance to U.S. farmers and ranchers. One of the agency’s primary goals is to sponsor educational and outreach programs about risk management and the tools offered by the agency. These programs help ensure access to the agency’s tools and products. The agency’s website also offers agency news, summaries of insurance sales, information on pilot programs, crop policies and downloadable publications.

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Groundbreaking conference planned to expand health policy advocacy in Indian Country

Minneapolis, Minn. – The American Heart Association (AHA) and the Shakopee Mdewakanton Sioux Community (SMSC) are co-sponsoring a major convening to explore opportunities to advance policy work relating to nutrition, food access, and other work to improve health outcomes in Indian Country. Scheduled for May 2-4, 2016, in Minneapolis, “Fertile Ground II: Growing the Seeds for Native American Health” will bring together Native American leaders, Native youth advocates, and national philanthropic organizations to develop solutions to address the health crisis in Indian Country.

Participants are encouraged to come ready with ideas to support achieving priorities within the following discussion areas:

Traditional Healthy Foods: Production, Food Sovereignty, and Nutrition

Empowering Our People: Youth Leadership and Intergeneration Holistic Health

Creating Healthy Communities: Child Care, Schools, and Communities

Tribes, health experts, and funders are encouraged to participate. Email fertileground@heart.org for more information on the event.

Native Americans face among the highest rates of childhood obesity, type 2 diabetes, and other chronic diseases in the United States. Without a dramatic and sustained investment in shifting these health trends, the future health and wellbeing of Native peoples and tribal nations are in jeopardy. “Fertile Ground II” seeks to explore Native-led advocacy and policy changes that can help address this health crisis.

“Fertile Ground II” is a continuation of the SMSC and AHA’s 2015 partnership to accelerate the development of a national framework to improve Native American nutrition and health. In October 2015, the two organizations convened representatives from 41 national philanthropic organizations to discuss the food crisis in Indian Country at “Fertile Ground: Planting the Seeds for Native American Nutrition and Health.” At the conference, participants agreed on concrete steps to develop solutions to this critical issue, including holding a second convening focused on Native-led advocacy and policy work.

Through Seeds of Native Health, the SMSC’s national philanthropic campaign to improve Native American nutrition, the tribe has brought together top experts and philanthropists in an effort to develop permanent solutions to this serious problem. The campaign also includes grant-making, education, and research efforts related to Native nutritional health.

“Fertile Ground II: Growing the Seeds for Native American Health” is also sponsored by the Marguerite Casey Foundation and MAZON: A Jewish Response to Hunger.

About the American Heart Association

The American Heart Association is devoted to saving people from heart disease and stroke – the two leading causes of death in the world. We team with millions of volunteers to fund innovative research, fight for stronger public health policies, and provide lifesaving tools and information to prevent and treat these diseases. The Dallas-based association is the nation’s oldest and largest voluntary organization dedicated to fighting heart disease and stroke. To learn more or to get involved, call 1-800-AHA-USA1, visit heart.org or call any of our offices around the country.

About the Shakopee Mdewakanton Sioux Community
The Shakopee Mdewakanton Sioux Community is a federally recognized, sovereign Indian tribe located southwest of Minneapolis/St. Paul. With a focus on being a good neighbor, good steward of the earth, and good employer, the SMSC is committed to charitable donations, community partnerships, a healthy environment, and a strong economy. Having donated more than $325 million since opening its Gaming Enterprise in the 1990s, as well as providing more than $500 million in economic development loans to other tribes, the SMSC is the largest philanthropic benefactor for Indian Country nationally and one of the largest charitable givers in Minnesota. The Seeds of Native Health campaign to improve the nutrition of Native Americans was launched in March 2015 with a $5 million contribution from the SMSC.

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