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FARM JOURNAL: Scholarships Available to Students Interested in Ag Careers

By Farm Journal Editors With the number of new job openings expected to increase this year, college graduates may find themselves at an advantage for landing their first full-time job. Agriculture majors offer a wealth of job opportunities in a wide array of areas,...

American Indians strive to restore nearly lost tribal food traditions

Reposted from the San Francisco Chronicle. Read the full story here. FORT BRAGG — A cold evening drizzle fell on this Mendocino County town as Aryana Henthorne and her family gathered on a spit of land just off Highway 1. The group of five arranged camp chairs around...

Quapaw Tribe Ag programs gain national attention

Reposted from the Miami News Record. See the full story here. The Quapaw Tribe is considered a national leader in agriculture and their Ag enterprises and the leader’s enthusiasm and commitment are the reasons Berrey was asked to speak at the prestigious event....

Seeds of Native Health helps launch new grant program for health-focused advocacy

The Seeds of Native Health campaign is excited to announce our partnership with the American Heart Association (AHA) and the American Indian Cancer Foundation (AICAF) to create a grant program that supports health-focused advocacy efforts in Native American...

The Indigenous Food and Agriculture Initiative honors Native American Heritage Month!

November is Native American Heritage Month, and a time to reflect on all that we have to be thankful for as we enjoy the harvest season during gatherings with family and friends. In Indian Country, culture and tradition are sustained through shared meals with family...

Section 504 Loan and Grant Program changes webinar Nov. 14

Register today for this information webinar on scheduled for November 14 to learn about recent changes to the 504 loan and grant program.  This training opportunity is open to individuals and organizations including nonprofits and public agencies who work with...

NAVAJO TIMES: Ranching Is Untapped Resource For Navajo

By Cindy Yurth Published October 29, 2017 CHINLE, ARIZONA – It’s common knowledge there are no jobs on the Navajo Nation. But to Delane Atcitty, that’s a bunch of bull. “There are jobs at home,” declared Atcitty, a rangeland management consultant who spoke at last...

Native American Political Leadership Program seeks scholarship apps

NAPLP is a full scholarship program for American Indian, Alaska Native, and Native Hawaiian undergraduate and graduate students to study applied American politics at the George Washington University in Washington DC.  As part of the Semester in Washington Politics...

SLATE: The Fight for the Right to Eat Seal Blubber

In Alaskan nursing homes and hospitals, tight federal regulations have meant that the most comforting foods for natives have been labeled illegal. That’s slowly changing. By Jonathan Reisman View the original story published in Slate here. One afternoon in 2014, May...

USDA Food and Nutrition Service opens Farm to School grant

Funding Opportunity #:  USDA-FNS-F2S-FY2018 For more information, visit Grants.gov:  FY 2018 Farm to School Grant Open (Posted) Date:  10/04/2017 Closed Date:  12/08/2017 In this funding cycle USDA anticipates awarding approximately $5 million in grant funding to...

REGAINING OUR FUTURE

The 2018 Farm Bill will significantly impact the five million American Indians and Alaska Natives in the United States.

To help Native American communities shape this massive legislation, the SMSC commissioned Regaining Our Future to analyze the risks and opportunities for Indian Country in the 2018 Farm Bill.

This report, authored by Janie Simms Hipp and Colby D. Duren of the Indigenous Food and Agriculture Initiative, is the most comprehensive analysis ever conducted on Farm Bill issues as they relate to Indigenous populations in the United States.

The Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA) was passed into law in ­­­­­­­­­­2014 to further the food safety of produce produced and consumed by the public. The US Food and Drug Administration was tasked to develop and implement regulations related to FSMA. Included in this is a comprehensive effort to train growers and suppliers such that they meet certification requirements of FSMA. FDA is working with public and private partners to ensure training programs meet the needs of those who must comply with the new FSMA standards, no matter their size, nature or location. It is important to make sure that those involved in the food supply chain know what training and education resources are available and how to gain access to the trainings.

Understanding and implementing produce safety practices are important to the safety of fruits and vegetables and to the viability of their farm business. Produce safety practices may be required by many buyers, as well as federal regulation if the farm is subject to the FSMA Produce Safety Rule.

In September 2016, the Indigenous Food and Agricultural Initiative (IFAI) at the University of Arkansas was named as the Native American Tribal Center for Food Safety Outreach, Education, Training and Technical Assistance. IFAI is cooperating with a wide array of partners, including the Intertribal Agricultural Council, to bring a series of webinars and face-to-face certification trainings to tribal producers and food businesses to fulfill requirements of FSMA. The four primary regulations that concern Tribal producer and food businesses are the Produce Safety Rule, The Preventive Control Act for Human Food, The Preventive Control Act for Animal Food and the Sanitary Transportation of Human and Animal Food, all of which are summarized on our Food Safety page:

 

READ MORE …

NEW VIDEO: Tribal Food Innovations with Choctaw Fresh Produce

Thank You To Our Sponsors:

The 2015 Feeding Ourselves report – commissioned by the American Heart Association and its Voices for Healthy Kids®, a joint initiative of the Indigenous Food and Agriculture Initiative, Echo Hawk Consulting, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the AHA – calls for tribes, the federal government and philanthropic organizations to serve as agents of change in Native food access.

Across Indian Country, tribal communities are rewriting a history of separation from their traditional foods. The Indigenous Food and Agriculture Initiative conducted this food scan on behalf of the W. K. Kellogg Foundation, which has a long standing commitment to improving health equity and supporting food systems change. The scan is a snapshot of some of the good work happening in Indian Country.

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Quapaw Tribe Ag programs gain national attention

Quapaw Tribe Ag programs gain national attention

Reposted from the Miami News Record. See the full story here. The Quapaw Tribe is considered a national leader in agriculture and their Ag enterprises and the leader’s enthusiasm and commitment are the reasons Berrey was asked to speak at the prestigious event....

read more
NAVAJO TIMES: Ranching Is Untapped Resource For Navajo

NAVAJO TIMES: Ranching Is Untapped Resource For Navajo

By Cindy Yurth Published October 29, 2017 CHINLE, ARIZONA – It’s common knowledge there are no jobs on the Navajo Nation. But to Delane Atcitty, that’s a bunch of bull. “There are jobs at home,” declared Atcitty, a rangeland management consultant who spoke at last...

read more

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